Select Country

Select a country to view information on local trademark law


Countries
A-E  F-J  K-O  P-T  U-Z

Multinational Agreements
AIPO/OAPI  ARIPO 
EUIPO  WIPO

Services Firms

Check IP services firms here

Feedback

Please report us if any of this content needs an update


Law Firms and
IP Consultancies

For legal advice please contact:

Namazie & Co.
Singapore, Singapore (SG)

More info

Get Listed

Promote your expertise to IP professionals worldwide.
read more

Singapore (SG)

Print this page
03-14-2017 (Newsletter Issue 5/17)
Official Fees Reduced Soon
The Intellectual Property Office of Singapore (IPOS) informed that the official fees for patent and trademark protection will be lowered.

As from April 1, 2017, fees will be reduced for patent search & examination reports. In addition, brand owners applying for trademarks using a pre-approved list of goods and services will enjoy a substantial 30% discount. The fee will be SGD 240 per class.

For further information, please click here

Source: Namazie & Co., Singapore and www.ipos.gov.sg


02-18-2014 (Newsletter Issue 3/14)
Trade Marks (Amendment) Rules 2013
The Intellectual Property Office of Singapore (IPOS) has published the Trade Mark (Amendment) Rules 2013 (Circular No. 9/2013, dated 22 November 2013) which came into effect on 1 January 2014.

A summary of the amendments is as follows:
(a) Amendment to the First Schedule of the TM Rules
Item 35 of the First Schedule is amended to clarify that the fee payable for the issuance of a certificate under section 103 of the Trade Marks Act (Cap. 322) is computed on a 'per certificate' basis.
This amendment does not impact the cost of requesting a certificate, as each certificate issued under section 103 may only be in respect of one trade mark.

(b) Amendment to the Third Schedule of the TM Rules
In view of the coming into force of the Tenth Edition, Version 2014 of the Nice Classification (hereinafter abbreviated as "NCL (10-2014)") on 1 January 2014, the Third Schedule is amended to reflect the changes to the Class headings and items introduced by NCL (10-2014).

To access the Amendment please click here

Source: www.ipos.gov.sg and Namazie & Co., Singapore


07-31-2012 (Newsletter Issue 12/12)
New Website Launched
The Intellectual Property Office of Singapore (IPOS) has recently launched a new website. The source is available in English and contains official information on patents, trade marks, registered designs, plant varieties and copyright, such as annual reports, legal texts, statistics and useful links. Users can also find links to all the e-services from e-filing to e-search, along with further details on filing an application at IPOS, forms and fees and information about IP service providers.

To access the new website, please click here

Source: www.epo.org


02-07-2012 (Newsletter Issue 2/12)
New Dispute Resolution Procedure
Singapore signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with WIPO establishing a dispute resolution procedure for IP disputes filed with IPOS on September 28, 2011. The new resolution allows IP disputes filed with IPOS to be mediated using WIPO rules. It took effect on January 3, 2012.

Source: Source: hslegal LLP, Singapore


11-08-2011 (Newsletter Issue 13/11)
Adoption of 10th Edition of Nice Classification
The Intellectual Property Office of Singapore (IPOS) announced on September 16, 2011, that the 10th edition of the Nice Classification will come into effect on January 1, 2012.
The Registry will provide more information on the specific changes shortly. However, the Search & Pick and eTrademarks Search databases will be duly updated and the relevant changes will be captured once the 10th edition of the Nice Classification comes into force.

The 9th edition of the Nice Classification shall continue to apply to all applications filed before January 1, 2012. Applications filed on or after January 1, 2012 shall be filed in accordance with the 10th edition of the Nice Classification. For the avoidance of doubt, there will be no reclassification of goods and services for existing applications filed prior to January 1, 2012, after the 10th edition of the Nice Classification comes into force. The Registry will conduct cross class searches to ensure that relevant citations are captured.

Source: www.ipos.gov.sg, Allen & Gledhill LLP, Singapore


11-08-2011 (Newsletter Issue 13/11)
Official Fees Increase in December
The Singapore's Intellectual Property Office has revised its fees upwards by an average of 10%, effective on December 1, 2011. The new official fees can be viewed here

Source: hslegal LLP, Singapore


10-25-2011 (Newsletter Issue 12/10)
Official Fees to Increase in November
The Intellectual Property Office of Singapore (IPOS) will increase its official fees sometime in November 2011. This was announced at a recent dialogue with IPOS. The increase in official fees takes place to meet in the increase in IPOS’s operating costs. In most cases, official fees are expected to increase by about 10%.

Source: hslegal LLP, Singapore


08-03-2011 (Newsletter Issue 10/11)
Revocation Process Changed
The Intellectual Property Office of Singapore (“IPOS”) amended the Trade Mark Rules for revocation actions filed on the ground of non-use. In the past, the registered proprietor’s evidence of use filed with the counter-statement has been accepted without the need for such evidence to be sworn.
Pursuant to Rule 69(1) of the Singapore Trade Mark Rules it is now required that “evidence shall be given by way of a statutory declaration unless otherwise provided by the Act of these Rules or directed by the Registrar”. This applies all inter partes proceedings including revocation actions.
This means that if a proprietor intends to defend his trade mark registration against revocation for non-use, he needs to file evidence of use by way of a statutory declaration together with his counter-statement. He is only required to show that he has an arguable case with prima facie evidence such as brochures and sales receipts. The evidence does not have to comprise the proprietor’s entire defence in relation to use as more detailed evidence, can be filed during the course of the proceedings. Alternatively, if a proprietor intends to defend his trade mark registration by giving proper reasons for non-use, he would only be expected to give these reasons in his counter-statement without a supporting statutory declaration.

If evidence is not filed in accordance with the Rules, the application for revocation will be granted and the registered proprietor’s trade mark registration will be revoked. As the Registrar has accepted counter-statements without sworn evidence under past practice, there will be a grace period from 1 May 2011 to 31 October 2011 for proprietors to re-file their evidence by way of a statutory declaration. After this grace period, the Registrar will grant the application for revocation if no evidence by way of a statutory declaration is filed with the counter-statement.

Source: hslegal LLP, Singapore


Legal basis is the Trademark Act of 1998, last amendment in force since July 2nd , 2007.
The principles of “common law” apply.
Singapore is a member of the Madrid Protocol.
Trademark protection is obtained by registration. It can also be acquired by sufficient public recognition.
Nice classification, 11th edition
What is Registrable as a Trademark
Registrable as a trademark are all distinctive and graphically representable signs capable of distinguishing between goods or services of the proprietor from other traders, such as words, names, acronyms, letters, numbers, devices, colours, combinations or shades of colours, sounds, signatures, labels, tickets, three-dimensional forms, the three-dimensional form of a good or its packaging and any combination of the mentioned signs.
Theoretically registrable are smell, hologram and movement marks as well. (NOTE: Hologram and movement marks have already been registered in IPOS – smell marks are still only theoretically registrable)
The following trademark types are registrable: trade marks, service marks, collective marks and certification marks.
The application is filed with the Intellectual Property Office of Singapore.
Multiple-class applications are possible.
To complement a multiple-class system, it is now possible to divide a trademark application into two or more applications. A trademark applicant may divide his application into two or more applications so that those classes of goods or services that do not face opposition or objection can proceed to registration first. Division will therefore expedite trademark registration where appropriate.
Foreign applicants do not need a local agent. An address for service in Singapore is necessary.
A power of attorney is not necessary.
Foreign applicants do not need a domestic registration.
The application process includes a formal examination, an examination of distinctiveness and registrability under the Trademark Act and a search for prior trademarks.
The processing time from first filing to registration or first office action is approx. 6 to 12 months.
Prior to registration, the trademark application is published in the Trade Mark Journal.
National:
The opposition period is 2 months from publication date of the application. A request for an extension of time to file the notice of opposition may be made by filing the necessary form within 2 months from the date of publication of the application in the Trade Marks Journal. In this case, the opponent has to notify the trademark applicant of its intention to apply for an extension of time and to request the latter’s consent. The total extension of time for which the Registrar may allow to file the notice of opposition cannot exceed 4 months from the date of the publication.

Details regarding the Opposition Period against designation of IR Mark are available in our publication on this topic here
A trademark registration is valid for 10 years from date of application.
The registration is renewable for periods of 10 years.
The grace period for renewals is 6 months after the expiration date of the mark.

Further practical details are available in our publication on this topic here
If the trademark has not been used within 5 years from issuance of the registration certificate or the Statement of Grant (for marks registered under the Madrid Protocol), or if it has not been used for any continuous 5-year period thereafter, it may become vulnerable to a revocation action.
Subsequent use of the trademark can restore protection if no party has requested revocation due to non-use in the meantime.

Further practical details are available in our publication on this topic here
The official fee for filing a trademark application is SGD 240 for each class using the pre-approved list of goods and services. There are no official fees payable at the publication and registration stages for trademark applications in Singapore.

Currency Converter   (Source for exchange-rates: bankenverband.de)
Find out how much this is in your own currency and convert!

Initial currency

Amount
left-to-right wrrow
convert into
Target currency

Amount

Practical details on licensing procedures, requirements and effectiveness are available in our publication on this topic here.
Search type First class Add. class
Word Mark Search (availability) 290,00 € 180,00 € 
Word Mark Search (identical) 260,00 € 160,00 € 

The Prices above are SMD Group Search Fees
Country Index is a free service of SMD Group. We thank the following law firms for their assistance in updating the information provided.

Country Survey
02-24-2017
Namazie & Co., Singapore, Singapore  

09-23-2015
Namazie & Co., Singapore, Singapore  

08-18-2014
Namazie & Co., Singapore, Singapore  

01-09-2013
Francine Tan Law Corporation, Singapore, Singapore

12-15-2011
Namazie & Co., Singapore, Singapore  

06-06-2011
Allen & Gledhill LLP, Singapore, Singapore



Namazie & Co.



Farah Namazie

Farah Namazie
51 Goldhill Plaza #24-06/07 Penthouse 4
308900 Singapore
Singapore (SG)
Tel + 65 65 38 97 11
Fax + 65 65 38 97 22
farahnamazie@namazie-law.com
www.namazie-law.com

Farah Namazie is a law graduate from Oxford University and a barrister of law from London.
She also holds a Masters degree in Intellectual Property law from the University of London.
Ms Namazie has been practising Intellectual Property for 16 years, and has also worked in – house for Apple Computers for some years. She publishes and lectures on Intellectual Property internationally.

Intellectual Property Office of Singapore
51 Bras Basah Road #04-01
Manulife Centre
Singapore 189554
Singapore
Tel +65 63 39 86 16
Fax +65 63 39 02 52
www.ipos.gov.sg

World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO)
34, Chemin des Colombettes
1211 Geneva 20
Switzerland
Tel +41 22 33 89 11 1
Fax +41 22 73 35 42 8
www.wipo.int